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DCYPS Social Work Team

The Disabled Children and Young People Service (DCYPS) Social Work Team undertake statutory social care services for children with severe or profound disabilities.

Who is eligible for a service from the DCYPS Social Work Team?

The children and young people who are supported in the DCYPS Social Work team are those who have severe profound disabilities. In Greenwich, those children/young people eligible for specialist social care provision are those assessed as eligible under the Chronically Sick and Disabled Persons Act 1970 (CSDPA).

The CSDPA applies to children/young people in Greenwich up to the age of 18. For those over 18, the Care Act 2014 is used to determine who is eligible for provision.

A decision around eligibility under CSDPA can only be made after a statutory social work assessment is undertaken. This assessment may be completed by either the Disabled Children Social Work Team or the Assessment & Support Service.

In terms of access to specialist short break intervention, a child or young person is considered as eligible for provision under the CSDPA if they have been assessed as having:

  • Severe learning disabilities.
  • Severe physical disabilities,
  • Severe and profound autistic spectrum disorders.
  • Disability arising out of serious or chronic illness.
  • Complex health needs.
  • Severe sight and/or hearing impairment.

A child with SEND who doesn’t require provision under CSDPA would have their social care needs assessed and met by the mainstream social care service.  Any required provision would be provided through Section 17 of the Children’s Act 1989.

More information on Personal Budgets and Direct Payments can be found here.

 


Select one of the drop-down menus below for more information on the Disabled Children Social Work Team

Social Care Assessments for Disabled Children in Greenwich

Assessments for Disabled Children in Greenwich

As set out in the Children’s Act 1989 all ‘disabled’ children are children ‘in need’.  When a disabled child presents to the LA, the LA must undertake an assessment and identify appropriate support services.

The form of the assessment should be based on presenting need, it may be a statutory social work assessment or an assessment of need by early help.  In whatever form they take, assessments of disabled children must be ‘holistic’, taking full account of the family context.

When a contact is made with the Local Authority (via MASH) requesting an assessment of a disabled child, consideration is given to the presenting needs of the child and family and a decision is taken on what type of assessment is required and who best can deliver this. Where there is existing evidence of a severe or profound disability, the assessment will be undertaken by the Disabled Children and Young People Service. Where there is evidence of moderate or mild disability, the assessment will be undertaken by the Assessment and Support Service. Regardless of which team undertakes the assessment, the same decision making process is followed when it comes to access to specialist support.

The assessment undertaken is a Section 17 Child and Family Assessment. A Child and Family Assessment is the social work assessment which is completed with a family to inform the child’s level of needs. The assessment includes all areas of the child’s life, including how their disability impacts their daily life, their wishes and feelings, understanding the impact on their siblings and parent carers.  The assessment also takes into account the important things around the child including their environment, wider family and community support.

This assessment determines if a child requires a specialist service. The same assessment is completed whether by the DCYPS or the mainstream Assessment and Support Service.  

Following a statutory social work assessment, the LA must decide which of the child’s needs that have been identified require an intervention. If the services assessed as necessary are available through the Local offer or other existing community resources, then the LA may not need to make any further provision. The family may choose not to access these services available, however alternatives may not be provided.

When a service is assessed as required, it can be provided either through the Children’s Act 1989 or the Chronically Sick and Disabled Person Act 1970 depending on the needs of the child and the provision being made.

 

What happens after the assessment:

For children and young people up to the age of 18, a decision on eligibility under CSDPA can only be made after a statutory Section 17 social work assessment is undertaken.  This assessment may have been completed by either the Disabled Children and Young People Social Work Team or the Assessment & Support Service.

The assessment outlining assessed eligible needs and recommendation for specialist short break support would be presented to the Short Break Panel for confirmation of eligibility and allocation of resources under CSDPA 1970. These specialist provisions may include individual packages of care either directly commissioned or accessed as a personal budget or direct payment.

If a child or young person is assessed as not eligible for specialist provision under the CSDPA, they may still access provision available through the Short Break Core Offer or if assessed as needed, provision for these children/young people may be made available under the powers of the Children’s Act 1989 rather than the CSPDA 1970. These packages are not accessible via a personal budget or direct payment.

Support Planning

Once the assessment is completed and determines a child requires a specialist package of care, the social worker creates a personalised support plan with the family to address the child’s needs. The support plan looks at the social care outcomes that have been identified for a child and what resources are available or required to meet them. Most children with SEND will have their social care outcomes best met through the Short Break Core Offer.

These are services funded by Greenwich to meet social care outcomes for children with SEND. However, some families will need additional provision to be made in addition to the Core Offer.

A Resource Allocation System known as a RAS is completed with the family and the Social Worker to give an idea of how much resource is required to meet the child’s outcomes in addition to the Short Break Core Offer. There is a RAS for primary aged children and secondary aged children. The practitioner supporting the family in this process will explain the RAS and go through it together. The information the family have shared during the assessment process will help inform the RAS.

Take a look at the RAS guidance and examples of the RAS forms below

Resource Allocation Questionnaire Primary School Version

Resource Allocation Questionnaire Secondary School Version

Guidance Notes for Resource Allocation System (RAS)

Disabled Child Support Plan